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of detroit starts the process of putting its priceless museum artwork up for auction. you wouldn't believe how much it could be worth. all those stories and much more coming up on the "kudlow report" right now. good evening, i'm larry kudlow. this is the "kudlow report." first up tonight, breaking news, jeff bezos paying $250 million for "the washington post" newspaper. a few days ago boston red sox owner john henry bought the "boston globe" for the bargain basement price of only $70 million. what is going on here? why will these foes succeed while others have failed. joining us is our own julia boorstin. why will they succeed where others have failed in. >> i think the question is how do you define success? one thing jeff bezos makes very clear in his letter about this and it was also in the press release is that he's not investing this just as a financial endeavor but he sees this as supporting journalism. he says "i understand the critical role the post plays in washington, d.c. and our nation and the post values will not change." he talks about the importance of the fact that the inter
will take a look at the details. >>> detroit may be the biggest u.s. city to ever declare bankruptcy. as it tries to fight its way back from a full-on collapse seems like the motor city's woes could have a major impact on other cities across the as we 9 embassies and consulate that were closed as a result of an al qaeda terror threat will reopen tomorrow, we will take a look at what motivated the change and what this means for an apparently ongoing threat. >> they had the capacity to go after our embassies. they have the capacity potentially to go after our businesses. they had the capacity to be destabilizing and disruptive in countries where the security apparatus are weak. i should definitely do laundry more often. yeah. by the time i do there's all these mystery stains. i mean is it coffee? could be gravy. yeah. so now i u tide boost with my tide. it's double powerful for when things get doubliffy. [ female announcer ] together, tide and tide boost double your power against stains that's my tide. first wait till summer. then get the cars ready. now add the dodge part. ♪ the do
western jet liners oh over detroit several years ago. so this has been going on for some time. al-qaeda in north africa tried to take over mali and would have succeeded had it not been for french intervention. >> paul: is mali really a threat to us? >> you could have made the same argument as afghanistan, a remote middle country in the middle of asia but it's a threat that it provides a secure base that al-qaeda can plan and plot. that is the issue. now, the biggest threat increasingly is syria where we have literally thousands of fighters affiliated with a front and other al-qaeda ideologically linked groups that are gaining strength. they are gaining expertise. they are gaining and creating sanctuaries. >> paul: and presumably hard to penetrate? >> they are importing jihadis from europe and going to perpetrate things. >> paul: we were told the syria isn't our fight, it's irrelevant to our security. it's over there, it's the middle east. we need to withdraw from the middle east and pivoted to asia because we have been stirring the hornets nest there? >> we are told what happens i
[ bleep ] story. >>> detroit police calling it an unprecedented case. a woman found dead, burned in a detroit apartment days after two other women were also found attacked. both left for dead in a nearby vacant field. one of them with burn marks on her body. cnn's rosa flores joins me with more on this one. and rosa, what are police saying? are they connecting these women at all? >> reporter: you know, that's the big question. i just got off the phone with detroit police, and the public information officer there tells me that they are investigating these three cases separately. right now they don't believe that these cases are related. but here is what we know. the latest body was discovered after detroit firefighters put out an apartment fire saturday. the woman has not been identified, but investigators do say that she is in her 20s. now, the medical examiner has not determined the cause of death at this point in time. here's what's very interesting. a week earlier to the day on jewel 27th, a 30-year-old woman was found physically assaulted in a vacant field. her continue is un
to a detroit station, detroit owner, they let me out of my contract just on a handshake because -- to come to nbc. 35 years ago. because i came under the understanding that i would only work for the graham family. that was how close the connection was, ruth. >> i think all of us have that -- who have been around for a while any way, interest that personal connection with the graham family. i have a column that should be on washingtonpost.com later this afternoon talking a little bit about that personal connection. and that is why i think in the newsroom and to some degree outside there is trust in this decision, that it is in the "washington post's" best interests because we've had so many years of seeing the graham family make decisions that were in the "washington post's" best interests. and, you know, but it is also you talk about the impact on you. i started to get calls yesterday and e-mails from government officials, from my children, from friends, from family, saying we're stunned, we're reeling, it really is the sort of earthquake moment in the life of the capital. >> it is a washi
coming into detroit as well as ink cartridges being filled with explosives and sent to america as well a year after that. a dangerous group. they were being used by al qaeda central now, apparently, to act out and to strike out and that's why the concerns were there, bill. bill: thank you, greg palkot, london there reporting. despite the latest terror threat the white house still contending that the core of al qaeda has been diminished, knocked out. ahead ambassador john bolton on that and what he thinks the terror network's resurgence and what it means for our national security. that is coming up with the ambassador. >> after four years of waiting the trial of the man charged in the 2009 fort hood massacre is about to begin. here is army psychiatrist, major nidal hasan as he looked that day when he admittedly killed 13 people and wounded dozens in an alleged shooting rampage. here is how he looks today as he prepares to represent himself and even cross-examine some of the wounded survivors. now we have casey stiegel there for us. he is live on the base at fort hood. he will join us in
of michigan and, of course, everybody's aware of the economic pain felt by the city of detroit, so finishing a swim there was also very symbolic. what we really wanted to show, number one, we're selling these bricks to help fund building projects, but there was also a message of hope we wanted to deliver, you know, that we don't have to sink with the weight of our burleds, you know? and if one man can pull a ton of bricks 22 miles, then what are we able to accomplish if we all pull together? i believe we will have the strength to pull ourselves out of this, and that was really the message that we delivered. jenna: it's such a powerful message, and it struck me as i was reading a little bit about you that most of the stories we do about detroit and about michigan are, as you mentioned, you know, they're negative because of what's going on right now with the economy. and you had an interesting interaction with a woman who traveled to see you at the end of this swim, jim. tell our viewers a little bit about that. >> this was the most special moment of the swim for me, you know? in addition to m
western jetliners over detroit. several years ago. so this has been going on for some time. al qaeda and north africa tried to take over earlier this year and would have succeed seeded had it not been for french intervention. >> you could have made the same argument 15 years ago -- is afghanistan a threat to us? distant highly -- remote little country in the middle of asia. but it is a threat to the extent it provides a secure base from which al qaeda can plan and plot. that's the issue. now the biggest threat increasingly i would say is not yemen but syria where we have thousands of fighters affiliated and other al qaeda linked al qaeda groups. and that are gaining strength. they are gaining expertise and gaining fighting experience. >> they are create sanctuaries inside of syria which will be presumably very hard for us to penetrate. >> right. not only that but they are importing jihadis from europe that will go home at one point back to hamburg or -- madrid. then they are going to create perpetrate you jihadi -- >> we were told that this syria isn't our fight. it is irrelevant to
who came to detroit in 2009. this is more -- is more general. i think if anything's changed it's that in the aftermath of the attack on our facility in benghazi and the deaths there of four americans and the continuing ha la ba lu from congress about embassy safety, people just want to err on the side of taking extra precautions. they don't have the same kind of specificity here they've had in other threats. what they have is significant personalities being involved in the threat stream and i think that's why they take it seriously. >> we are living in a post-benghazi world and benghazi drives so much of this. >> exactly. so richard haas, talk a little bit about -- what's the president's for closing -- precedence for closing 22 embassies and this al qaeda resurgence. >> let me start with the latter. people are focusing on the u.s. reaction which i think is appropriate. the bigger story this is the new normal. this is now a middle east where you no longer have countries that are essentially controlled by their governments. it's been the case in pakistan for some time, which is w
qaeda in yemen that has been able to reach out and touch. think of that detroit airliner bombing. >> that terror group has significant capabilities, expertise and resources. 19 of the almost two dozen american diplomatic posts throughout northern africa that were closed sunday will not open for the rest of the week, as we mentioned earlier and prompting officials that the obama administration said was on the run is running right towards us. the newest messages by senior al qaeda members show the urging of an attack may be complete. >> some individuals who are making plan such as we saw before 9/11, whether they are going to be suicide deaths that are used or whether they're planning on vehicle-borne cars, we don't know. >> counterterrorism officials were paying plenty of attention because of a rash of brazen prison breaks in three countries, freeing hundreds of extremists. july 26, nearly 1,200 inmates were set free in benghazi, libya. july 30th, pakistan, taliban gunmen freed 200 inmates. want it just recently we were told that al qaeda was all but left for dead? >> today al qae
. detroit is dead and al qaeda is obviously alive. it's a distinction he wants to make and pretend he's always been making it, but it does shed light on why they so insistent on denying that the benghazi attack was a terror attack by an affiliate of al qaeda, because, remember, the run-up to the election, al qaeda was supposedly dead, and it would have meant admitting that there were al qaeda affiliates even in north africa. this isn't even in yemen that everybody knew about, but even in north africa. capable enough of attacking an embassy, sacking it and killing an ambassador. so a distinction they only used after an election as a way to cover-up the cover-up that happened before the election. >> julie, ed henry asked about benghazi and the president september 12th of last year saying that those responsible will be brought to justice. take a listen to his answer. >> i also said that we'd get bin laden and i didn't get him in 11 months. so we have informed i think the public that there's a sealed indictment. it's sealed for a reason. but we are intend on capturing those who carried ou
the detroit tigers, and others saying here's what we should add to baseball's arsenal -- the right at the team's discretion to void a long-term contract if a player is found, and after he gets due process and goes through appeals, so it's a fair process, if the player is found to have used peds, the team has the right to void the long-term contract. in the case of ryan braun, for example, he loses $3 million. that's a lot of money. but there's still about $100 million left on the contract. if you put in that clause, that you could void a deal, that's a tremendous disincentive. >> bob costas of nbc sports, thank you so much. what an important time with the suspension of alex rodriguez coming down to tomorrow according to your reporting from nbc sports. bob, thank you as always. >>> andrea mitchell, you're such a big sports fan. my own son said to me if one of his players he really likes a lot is caught up in this, he's going to throw away his jersey. this really matters in terms of the future of the game. >> baseball is america. baseball to me is essential sport. and the fact that it has been s
cruz, an outfielder and detroit tigers johnny peralta had 50 suspensions. they're in the middle of a pennant race. the appeal could be heard in ten days. there have been calls to move up the process. potentially, a-rod could play another 20 games before it is all decided. >> thank you. >>> big stories on fox stations nationwide tonight, wfld is all over the a-rod story as he and the yankees play the white sox at u.s. cellular park. our affiliate in boston covering closing arguments in the whitey bulger trial, a mobster facing life behind bars potentially. this is a live look at houston, courtesy of kriv. the big story there, charging a bar customer with giving another drunk patron drinks before she killed two teenagers in a wrong way wreck. strategy i can story live from houston. that's tonight's live look outside the belt from "special report." we'll be right back. ♪ how mu protein does your dog food have? 18 percent? 20? new purina one true instinct has 30. active dogs crave nutrient-dense food. so we made purina one true instinct. learmore at purinaone.com >>> one of the mo
detroit on christmas day and a 2010 plot to send bombs in printer cartridges in cargo planes bound for the u.s. both plots were foiled at the last minute. in 2009, al asiri even planted a bomb on his own brother in his underwear or a body cavity. the brother got close to saudi arabia's counter terror chief and set it off, killing himself but not the saudi minister. >> what does it say that he does this with his own brother? >> it says that he's absolutely ruthless. not only is ibrahim al asiri absolutely ruthless, he is, according to leading explosive experts in the west, really good at what he does. he's proud the most sophisticated devices ever seen from al qaeda. >> reporter: last year, u.s. officials say al asiri was behind another foiled plot to send another bomb in the underwear of a terrorist on a commercial plane bound for the u.s. the head of the tsa called that a next gen device. >> it was a new type of explosive that we had never seen and either attempted in the u.s. or around the world by terrorists. so all of our explosive detection equipment which screens over a milli
into detroit. they've attacked our embassy there before. there's a very active franchise of al qaeda operating there in yemen. it's one to be taken seriously. we've had successes against them. the yemenis have been wonderful partners in this fight, but at the same time we have to take these kind of steps to the ensure we keep the initiative and we're not reacting to the enemy after the fact. reacting ahead of time and setting the conditions can throw the enemy on their back foot. >> you know, i want to play a little bit of what representative peter king, he's the chairman of the house homeland security subcommittee on counterterrorism and intelligence. i interviewed him about an hour and a half or so ago, and listen to this little clip, general. then we'll discuss. >> i have been getting briefed fairly regularly over the last seven, eight years at least, and also pretty heavily before then, and this is the most specific i have seen. and, again, i don't think i'm giving anything away when you look at the reaction to have 21 embassies being closed shows how seriously our government is taking it,
on an american jet over detroit. and dispatch bombs on a cargo plane bound for the u.s. three to four yemeni fighters were involved in the benghazi attack last year. the obama administration expanded the drone program in yemen. in 2011 drones killed and war -- anwar al awlaki. there are far fewer strikes this year compared to 2012. >> the number of attacks is falling because they have in fact gotten to some of the top tier leadership, is what the administration would say. i think what we're seeing this week calls that into question. it's hard to assess. >> right now there are more than 100 troops on the ground in yemen, split between the marines helping to protect the embassy and special operation forces down south training the yemeni forces on counterterrorism. >> thanks, chris. so how serious is the threat. joining suss michael hayden, now a principal at a global security firm. the drone strikes in yemen, do you think they're directly related to this latest threat that the u.s. detected coming from al zawahiri to a top al qaeda in yemen? >> it's hard to tell. we've had a campaign in yemen
o'reilly has called on viewers to help. so far they have raised $8 million. martha: one detroit area doctor is facing serious charges today. here is a picture of him. he's accused of bilking the government out of tens of millions of dollars by deliberately misdiagnosing patients with cancer, then giving them chemotherapy they did not need, then illegally billing immediate care for that treatment. you're mind cannot wrap around what this man is accused of doing. laura ingle is live in our newsroom in new york city. >> reporter: there is a staggering list of accusations against the doctor. he got rich by mistreating patients. by administering chemotherapy when his patients didn't need it. the government claims that he billed $35 million to medicare over 2 years, raking in $24 million in drug infiewks building. the drug complaint says co-workers dozens of people pass through the offices each day with the doctor only spending minutes with each patient, then hiring doctors who may not have been properly licensed. one nurse said she saw chemotherapy given at inappropriate times and treat t
of detroit and chicago that these cities in deep financial trouble may with looking -- may be looking to push some retirees into the health care exchanges instead of having to pay for health care benefits until they're the age of 65 or so, michael. if that happens and, again, it's just an idea, but if health care becomes entrenched in that way because of decisions made by politicians at a local level, how does that influence the political debate? >> i think one of the ways is that if cities, cities with big payrolls like shaq -- like chicago dump their employees on the health care exchanges, this program is going to end up costing more than has been projected, because those assumptions were baked into the bill. one of the things you have to realize about this bill is that even its backers admit that it was not the ideal piece of legislation they wanted. that's because after the victory of scott brown, the republican in the special senate election in january 2010, democrats no longer had the 60 votes they needed to beat back a pily buster in the -- filibuster in the senate. and their only path
for base operating support to a cluster. we've got a unit in detroit, michigan and is providing protection in a large number of individual small reserve units. you'll be happy to know that my standard quest today after i get done with this mess where do you remember the reserve officers association? and have you paid your dues? most of that get me a bit curious. and when i get done, i said in about nine hours i will be speaking to the reserve officers association and for a fact i pulled out my notebook and said i'm taking names. so the next few days, your membership committee is busier than usual. i'm going to take a little bit of credit for that. [applause] frankly, beyond that he no the more important reason i'm glad it's such an influential unengaged amount of leaders. i've got a great deal about dinesen about where we are in the campaign right now. there are challenges and i will address those, but we have a real opportunity to be successful. i am mindful that not everybody shares my optimism. i am sure most of you saw the recent poll that said 67% of americans believe the war in afgha
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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